Large Block farming

Large Block farming

posted in: Uncategorized | 0

Simon Tiller Nuffield Scholar has two large farming blocks of land, manages contractors to help with his harvest. Has identified which parts of the business earn money and how to utilise assets to there full potential. showed me his home made pit and blending facility. Is using a tine drill and a disc seeder with mutliple hoppers. Took me to a sheep feed lot, which buys in damaged grain, wheat straw and mixes in a keenan feeder. Had delivered while i was there a CBH sampling hut which comes with a member of staff to sample grain going to the store terminal which speeds up the turn around time. Only the larger farmers have this or ones who are happy for others to use as well. I wish Simon luck for the future.

Posted by Picasa
Its not just europe that can go Big crops

Its not just europe that can go Big crops

posted in: Uncategorized | 0

Andrew Fowler Nuffield Scholar and wife Marie last farmer before the bush. Has a beach at the end of his farm with sand that squeeks. Well run farming business with a brother who loves livestock, perfect situation. Uses David Cox’s N strips to determine nitrogen requirement if any and grazes crops to achieve a gross margin on livestock on par with Cropping. Diverse cropping with Wheat, Barley, canola and clover/ryegrass for cattle and sheep to graze. The clover is burnt off and allowed to regenerate three years later. Growing roundup ready canola. Uses his sprayers as swathers which was utilising assets. The sprayers where so big i could drive the car underneath. Canola was yielding over the bridge 2.2 tonnes to the ha. Andrew and Marie kindly put me up for two nights. Andrew took me to the local pub which had one of the largest burgers i’ve ever eaten. Im currently 1 stone heavier from meeting Andrew and David Cox. I thank Andrew and Marie for looking after me.

Posted by Picasa
Silver loam, gods country.

Silver loam, gods country.

posted in: Uncategorized | 0

David showed me his soil type, i’ve never seen land like it, he should get a medal for achieving such good crops. David and sally very kindly looked after me in Esperance and he took time out of his week to take me to Summit fertiliser, CBH in Esperance port facility, Sepwa to visit Nigel Metz and Land Logic. David was grazing crops with imported livestock and was proving to have no yield detrement, increasing gross margins on a livestock enterprise and being able to achieve a return on marginal land. David from his Nuffield studies was working on the concept of N strips which he was passionate about. The basic idea was to ask the plant what it needed by ruling out nitrogen as a requirement. he would apply double what he would normally to a strip in a field and then scan with a green seeker and then scan the unapplied area of the crop and with a Top Secret formular could determine what the Nitrogen requirement of the crop was, this had the potential to save ten of thousands of pounds per year for farmers which subscribe. I wish the Cox family a happy harvest and wish them success for the future.

Posted by Picasa
Spot the arable farmer.

Spot the arable farmer.

posted in: Uncategorized | 0

Arrived in Perth and Ed Cox picked me up from Ralphs my step brothers house and took me down to Esperance an 8 hour drive to meet his brother David and family.

We went kangaroo shooting the first night in Busselton, and i must have been given RSPCA cartridges.
On the way down we hit a Kangeroo which made a mess of Ed’s truck, he need a new one anyway!, lucky for me we had just change over driving, its an interesting drive.

Posted by Picasa
China 17th October – 29th October 2010

China 17th October – 29th October 2010

posted in: Uncategorized | 0

Arrived in china and meet up with the group, Arwyn, Claire, Tony, Kevin, Jim, Helen and Helen. We started our adventure around china with new smells, tastes and sights. The pictures shows an afternoon at a school teaching students about the UK. Luckly we did it in pairs and arwyn was my double and did a sterling job entertaining the students with talking welsh and showing them his home on Snowdon. My lasting impression of the trip was Tony had the ability to eat anything including chickens heads, turtles, chicken feet. The chinese people believe they will be the farmers to feed the world.

Posted by Picasa

Rural crime & farming

posted in: Uncategorized | 0

BBC Radio Cambridgeshire

As part of last week’s BBC Radio Cambridgeshire look at rural crime, Breakfast Show presenter Jeremy Sallis came down to P.X. Farms to find out from James what experiences he’s had, and what P.X. Farms are doing to prevent crime.

Jeremy also spoke to the NFU about Cambridgeshire Police’s Rural Community Action Team and how they were trying to assist farmers in the fight against crime. The section was transmitted on the 3rd September and is reproduced below with kind permission of BBC Radio Cambridgeshire.

If you wish to download the file so that you can listen to it later ‘right click’ the following link and choose the save option from the fly out menu: Rural crime – P.X. Farms on Radio Cambridgeshire (6.6 MB – MP3 format).

The whole breakfast show is available to listen to again for one week after transmission via the BBC iPlayer.

BBC iPlayer

1 99 100 101 102 103 104 105